bella maree : This Is An Un Official Fan Site Tribute
bella maree
Porn Queen Actress Superstar


bella maree

mass unemployment, there were now labour shortages and women becoming active in male roles. Sydney's harbour was attacked by the Japanese in May and June 1942 with a direct attack from Japanese submarines with some loss of life.[71] Households throughout the city had built air raid shelters and performed drills. Consequently, Sydney experienced population growth and increased cultural diversification throughout the post-war period. The people of Sydney warmly welcomed Queen Elizabeth II in 1954 when the reigning monarch stepped onto Australian soil for the first time to commence her Australian Royal Tour.[72] Having arrived on the Royal Yacht Britannia through Sydney Heads, Her Majesty came ashore at Farm Cove. There were 1.7 million people living in Sydney at 1950 and almost 3 million by 1975. The Australian government launched a large scale multicultural immigration program. Sydney hosted the 2000 Summer Olympics. New industries such as information technology, education, financial services and the arts have risen. Sydney's iconic Opera House was opened in 1973 by Her Majesty. A new skyline of concrete and steel skyscrapers swept away much of the old lowrise and often sandstone skyline of the city in the 1960s and 1970s, with Australia Square being
the tallest building in Sydney from its completion in 1967 until 1976 and is also notable for being the first skyscraper in Australia.[73] This prolific growth of contemporary high-rise architecture was put in check by heritage laws in the 1990s onwards, which prevent demolition of any structure deemed historically significant. Since the 1970s Sydney has undergone a rapid economic and social transformation. As a result, the city has become a cosmopolitan melting pot. To relieve congestion on the Sydney Harbour Bridge, the Sydney Harbour Tunnel opened in August 1992. The 2000 Summer Olympics were held in Sydney and became known as the "best Olympic Games ever" by the President of the International Olympic Committee.[74] Sydney has maintained extensive political, economic and cultural influence over Australia as well as international renown in recent decades. Following the Olympics, the city hosted the 2003 Rugby World Cup, the APEC Australia 2007 and Catholic World Youth Day 2008, led by Pope Benedict XVI.



Topography Sydney lies on a submergent coastline where the ocean level has risen to flood deep rias. Sydney is a coastal basin with the Tasman Sea to the east, the Blue Mountains to the west, the Hawkesbury River to the north, and the Woronora Plateau to the south. The inner city measures 25 square kilometres (10 square miles), the Greater Sydney region covers 12,367 square kilometres (4,775 square miles), and the city's urban area is 1,687 square kilometres (651 square miles) in size.[75][76][77] In terms of physical size, the Sydney metropolitan area is comparable to both Tokyo, at 13,452 square kilometres (5,194 square miles)[78] and Los Angeles, at 12,559 square kilometres (4,849 square miles).[79] Sydney spans two geographic regions. The Cumberland Plain lies to the south and west of the Harbour and is relatively flat. The Hornsby Plateau is located to the north and is dissected by steep valleys. The flat areas of the south were the first to be developed as the city grew. It was not until the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge that the northern reaches of the coast became more heavily populated. Seventy beaches can be found along its coastline with Bondi Beach being one of the most famous. The Nepean River wraps around the western edge of the city and becomes the Hawkesbury River before reaching Broken Bay. Most of Sydney's water storages can be found on tributaries of the Nepean River. The Parramatta River is mostly industrial and drains a large area of Sydney's western suburbs into Port Jackson. The southern parts of the city are drained by the Georges River and the Cooks River into Botany Bay. Geology Almost all of the exposed rocks around Sydney are Sydney sandstone. Sydney is made up of mostly Triassic rock with some recent igneous dykes and volcanic necks. The Sydney Basin was formed when the Earth's crust expanded, subsided, and filled with sediment in the early Triassic period.[80] The sand that was to become the sandstone of today was washed there by rivers from the south and northwest, and laid down between 360 and 200 million years ago. The sandstone has shale lenses and fossil riverbeds.[80] The Sydney Basin bioregion includes coastal features of cliffs, beaches, and estuaries. Deep river valleys known as rias were carved during the Triassic period in the Hawkesbury sandstone of the coastal region where Sydney now lies. The rising sea level between 18,000 and 6,000 years ago flooded the rias to form estuaries and deep harbours.[80] Port Jackson, better known as Sydney Harbour, is one such ria.[81] Ecology Further information: Ecology of Sydney A dry sclerophyll bushland in Sydney with eucalyptus trees (Royal National Park, Sutherland Shire) The most prevalent plant communities in the Sydney region are open grassy woodlands[82] and some pockets of dry sclerophyll forests,[83] which consist of eucalyptus trees, casuarinas, melaleucas, corymbias and angophoras, with shrubs (typically wattles, callistemons, grevilleas and banksias), and a semi-continuous grass in the understory.[84] The plants in this community tend to have rough and spiky leaves, as they're grown in areas with low soil fertility. Sydney also features a few areas of wet sclerophyll forests which are found in the wetter, elevated areas in the north and the northeast. These forests are defined by straight, tall tree canopies with a moist understory of soft-leaved shrubs, tree ferns and herbs.[85] Sydney is home to dozens of bird species,[86] which commonly include the Australian raven, Australian magpie, crested pigeon, noisy miner and the pied currawong, among others. Introduced bird species ubiquitously found in Sydney are the common myna, common starling, house sparrow and the spotted dove.[87] Reptile species are also numerous and predominantly include skinks.[88][89] Sydney has a few mammal and spider species, such as the grey-headed flying fox and the Sydney funnel-web, respectively,[90][91] and a huge diversity of marine species inhabiting its harbour and many beaches.[92] Climate Main article: Climate of Sydney Sydney, New South Wales Climate chart (explanation) J F M A M J J A S O N D 96 2720 137 2720 109 2518 137 2315 118 2113 118 1810 81 179 92 1910 69 2112 82 2314 105 2416 79 2618 Average max. and min. temperatures in C Precipitation totals in mm Imperial conversion A summer thunderstorm over the city taken from Potts Point, 1991. Under the classic system Sydney has a temperate climate but under the KppenGeiger classification, Sydney has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa)[93] with warm summers, cool winters and uniform rainfall throughout the year.[94] At Sydney's primary weather station at Observatory Hill, extreme temperatures have ranged from 45.8 C (114.4 F) on 18 January 2013 to 2.1 C (35.8 F) on 22 June 1932.[95][96][97] An average of 14.9 days a year have temperatures at or above 30 C (86 F) in the central business district (CBD).[98] In contrast, the metropolitan area averages between 35 and 65 days, depending on the suburb.[99] The highest minimum temperature recorded at Observatory Hill is 27.6 C (82 F), on 6 February 2011, while the lowest maximum temperature is 7.7 C (46 F), recorded on 19 July 1868.[98] The average annual temperature of the sea ranges from 18.5 C (65.3 F) in September to 23.7 C (74.7 F) in February.[100] The weather is moderated by proximity to the ocean, and more extreme temperatures are recorded in the inland western suburbs.[98] Sydney experiences an urban heat island effect.[101] This makes certain parts of the city more vulnerable to extreme heat, including coastal suburbs.[101][102] In late spring and summer, temperatures over 35 C (95 F) are not uncommon,[103] though hot, dry conditions are usually ended by a southerly buster,[104] a powerful southerly that brings gale winds and a rapid fall in temperature.[105] Since Sydney borders the Blue Mountains, it can occasionally experience dry, Fhn-like and katabatic winds originating from the Great Dividing Range, usually between late winter and spring, that raise temperatures and elevate fire danger.[106][107][108] Due to the inland location, frost is recorded early in the morning in Western Sydney a few times in winter. Autumn and spring are the transitional seasons, with spring showing a larger temperature variation than autumn.[109] Autumn foliage in May The rainfall has a moderate to low variability and it is spread through the months, but is slightly higher during the first half of the year.[98][110] From 1990 to 1999, Sydney received around 20 thunderstorms per year.[111] In late autumn and winter, east coast lows may bring large amounts of rainfall, especially in the CBD.[112] In spring and summer, black nor'easters are usually the cause of heavy rain events, though other forms of low-pressure areas may also bring heavy deluge and afternoon thunderstorms.[113] Depending on the wind direction, summer weather may be humid or dry, with the late summer/autumn period having a higher average humidity and dewpoints than late spring/early summer. In summer, most rain falls from thunderstorms and in winter from cold fronts.[114] Snowfall was last reported in the Sydney City area in 1836, while a fall of graupel, or soft hail, was mistaken by many for snow, in July 2008.[115] The city is rarely affected by cyclones, although remnants of ex-cyclones do affect the city. The El NioSouthern Oscillation plays an important role in determining Sydney's weather patterns: drought and bushfire on the one hand, and storms and flooding on the other, associated with the opposite phases of the oscillation. Many areas of the city bordering bushland have experienced bushfires, these tend to occur during the spring and summer. The city is also prone to severe storms. One such storm was the 1999 hailstorm, which produced massive hailstones up to 9 cm (3.5 in) in diameter.[116] The Bureau of Meteorology reported that 2002 to 2005 were the warmest summers in Sydney since records began in 1859.[117] The summer of 200708, however, proved to be the coolest since 199697 and is the only summer this century to be at or below average in temperatures.[118] In 2009, dry conditions brought a severe dust storm towards eastern Australia.[119][120] The hottest day in the Sydney metropolitan area occurred in Penrith on 6 January 2020, where a high of 48.9 C (120.0 F) was recorded.[121] vte Climate data for Sydney (Observatory Hill) Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Record high C (F) 45.8 (114.4) 42.1 (107.8) 39.8 (103.6) 35.4 (95.7) 30.0 (86.0) 26.9 (80.4) 26.5 (79.7) 31.3 (88.3) 34.6 (94.3) 38.2 (100.8) 41.8 (107.2) 42.2 (108.0) 45.8 (114.4) Average high C (F) 27.0 (80.6) 26.8 (80.2) 25.7 (78.3) 23.6 (74.5) 20.9 (69.6) 18.2 (64.8) 17.9 (64.2) 19.3 (66.7) 21.6 (70.9) 23.2 (73.8) 24.2 (75.6) 25.7 (78.3) 22.8 (73.0) Daily mean C (F) 23.5 (74.3) 23.3 (73.9) 22.0 (71.6) 19.4 (66.9) 16.6 (61.9) 14.1 (57.4) 13.4 (56.1) 14.5 (58.1) 16.9 (62.4) 18.9 (66.0) 20.4 (68.7) 22.0 (71.6) 18.8 (65.7) Average low C (F) 20.0 (68.0) 19.9 (67.8) 18.4 (65.1) 15.3 (59.5) 12.3 (54.1) 10.0 (50.0) 8.9 (48.0) 9.7 (49.5) 12.3 (54.1) 14.6 (58.3) 16.6 (61.9) 18.4 (65.1) 14.7 (58.5) Record low C (F) 10.6 (51.1) 9.6 (49.3) 9.3 (48.7) 7.0 (44.6) 4.4 (39.9) 2.1 (35.8) 2.2 (36.0) 2.7 (36.9) 4.9 (40.8) 5.7 (42.3) 7.7 (45.9) 9.1 (48.4) 2.1 (35.8) Average rainfall mm (inches) 91.1 (3.59) 131.5 (5.18) 117.5 (4.63) 117.1 (4.61) 100.2 (3.94) 144.7 (5.70) 76.8 (3.02) 75.4 (2.97) 63.4 (2.50) 67.7 (2.67) 90.6 (3.57) 73.0 (2.87) 1,150.1 (45.28) Average rainy days (= 1 mm) 8.2 9.0 10.1 8.1 7.8 9.2 7.1 5.6 5.8 7.6 8.7 7.9 95.1 Average afternoon relative humidity (%) 60 62 59 58 58 56 52 47 49 53 57 58 56 Mean monthly sunshine hours 235.6 202.4 213.9 207.0 195.3 177.0 204.6 244.9 237.0 244.9 228.0 244.9 2,635.5 Percent possible sunshine 53 54 56 61 59 60 65 72 66 61 55 55 60 Source 1: Bureau of Meteorology[122][123] (19912020 averages, records 1861) Source 2: Bureau of Meteorology, Sydney Airport (sunshine hours)[124] Regions See also: Regions of Sydney Satellite photo of the Sydney area at night. Wollongong can be seen at bottom left, while Gosford and the Central Coast are visible at the far right. The regions of Sydney include the CBD or City of Sydney (colloquially referred to as 'the City') and Inner West, the Eastern Suburbs, Southern Sydney, Greater Western Sydney (including the South-west, Hills District and the Macarthur Region), and the Northern Suburbs (including the North Shore and Northern Beaches). The Greater Sydney Commission divides Sydney into five districts based on the 33 LGAs in the metropolitan area; the Western City, the Central City, the Eastern City, the North District, and the South District.[125] The Australian Bureau of Statistics includes City of Central Coast (the former Gosford City and Wyong Shire) as part of Greater Sydney for population counts.[126] This adds another 330,000 people to the metropolitan area covered by Greater Sydney Commission.[127] Inner suburbs The CBD extends about 3 kilometres (1.9 miles) south from Sydney Cove. It is bordered by Farm Cove within the Royal Botanic Garden to the east and Darling Harbour to the west. Suburbs surrounding the CBD include Woolloomooloo and Potts Point to the east, Surry Hills and Darlinghurst to the south, Pyrmont and Ultimo to the west, and Millers Point and The Rocks to the north. Most of these suburbs measure less than 1 square kilometre (0.4 square miles) in area. The Sydney CBD is characterised by considerably narrow streets and thoroughfares, created in its convict beginnings in the 18th century.[128] Anzac Bridge, spanning Johnstons Bay, links western suburbs to the CBD. Several localities, distinct from suburbs, exist throughout Sydney's inner reaches. Central and Circular Quay are transport hubs with ferry, rail, and bus interchanges. Chinatown, Darling Harbour, and Kings Cross are important locations for culture, tourism, and recreation. The Strand Arcade, which is located between Pitt Street Mall and George Street, is a historical Victorian-style shopping arcade. Opened on 1 April 1892, its shop fronts are an exact replica of the original internal shopping facades.[129] Westfield Sydney, located beneath the Sydney Tower, is the largest shopping centre by area in Sydney.[130] There is a long trend of gentrification amongst Sydney's inner suburbs. Pyrmont located on the harbour was redeveloped from a centre of shipping and international trade to an area of high density housing, tourist accommodation, and gambling.[131] Originally located well outside of the city, Darlinghurst is the location of the historic, former Darlinghurst Gaol, manufacturing, and mixed housing. It had a period when it was known as an area of prostitution. The terrace style housing has largely been retained and Darlinghurst has undergone significant gentrification since the 1980s.[132][133][134] King Street in Newtown is one of the most complete Victorian and Edwardian era commercial precincts in Australia. Green Square is a former industrial area of Waterloo which is undergoing urban renewal worth $8 billion. On the city harbour edge, the historic suburb and wharves of Millers Point are being built up as the new area of Barangaroo. The enforced rehousing of local residents due to the Millers Point/Barangaroo development has caused significant controversy despite the $6 billion worth of economic activity it is expected to generate.[135][136] The suburb of Paddington is a well known suburb for its streets of restored terrace houses, Victoria Barracks, and shopping including the weekly Oxford Street markets.[137] Inner West The Inner West generally includes the Inner West Council, Municipality of Burwood, Municipality of Strathfield, and City of Canada Bay. These span up to about 11 km west of the CBD. Suburbs in the Inner West have historically housed working class industrial workers, but have undergone gentrification over the 20th century. The region now mainly features medium- and high-density housing. Major features in the area include the University of Sydney and the Parramatta River, as well as a large cosmopolitan community. The Anzac Bridge spans Johnstons Bay and connects Rozelle to Pyrmont and the City, forming part of the Western Distributor. The area is serviced by the T1, T2, and T3 railway lines, including the Main Suburban Line; which is the first to be constructed in New South Wales. Strathfield Railway Station is a secondary railway hub within Sydney, and major station on the Suburban and Northern lines. It was constructed in 1876,[138] and will be a future terminus of Parramatta Light Rail.[139] The area is also serviced by numerous bus routes and cycleways.[140] Other shopping centres in the area include Westfield Burwood and DFO in Homebush. Eastern suburbs Sydney skyline as viewed from Tasman Sea, overlooking the clifftop suburb of Vaucluse. The Eastern Suburbs encompass the Municipality of Woollahra, the City of Randwick, the Waverley Municipal Council, and parts of the Bayside Council. The Greater Sydney Commission envisions a resident population of 1,338,250 people by 2036 in its Eastern City District (including the City and Inner West).[141] They include some of the most affluent and advantaged areas in the country, with some streets being amongst the most expensive in the world. Wolseley Road, in Point Piper, has a top price of $20,900 per square metre, making it the ninth-most expensive street in the world.[142] More than 75% of neighbourhoods in the Electoral District of Wentworth fall under the top decile of SEIFA advantage, making it the least disadvantaged area in the country.[143] Bondi Beach Major landmarks include Bondi Beach, a major tourist site; which was added to the Australian National Heritage List in 2008;[144] and Bondi Junction, featuring a Westfield shopping centre and an estimated office work force of 6,400 by 2035,[145] as well as a train station on the T4 Eastern Suburbs Line. The suburb of Randwick contains the Randwick Racecourse, the Royal Hospital for Women, the Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney Children's Hospital, and the UNSW Kensington Campus. Randwick's 'Collaboration Area' has a baseline estimate of 32,000 jobs by 2036, according to the Greater Sydney Commission.[146] Construction of the CBD and South East Light Rail was completed in April 2020.[147] Main construction was due to be completed in 2018 but was delayed until 2020.[148] The project aims to provide reliable and high-capacity tram services to residents in the City and South-East. Major shopping centres in the area include Westfield Bondi Junction and Westfield Eastgardens, although many residents shop in the City. Southern Sydney Kurnell, La Perouse, Cronulla, along with various other suburbs face Botany Bay. Southern Sydney includes the suburbs in the local government areas of former Rockdale, Georges River Council (collectively known as the St George area), and broadly it also includes the suburbs in the local government area of Sutherland, south of the Georges River (colloquially known as 'The Shire'). The Kurnell peninsula, near Botany Bay, is the site of the first landfall on the eastern coastline made by Lt. (later Captain) James Cook in 1770. La Perouse, a historic suburb named after the French navigator Jean-Franois de Galaup, comte de Laprouse (174188), is notable for its old military outpost at Bare Island and the Botany Bay National Park. The suburb of Cronulla in southern Sydney is close to Royal National Park, Australia's oldest national park. Hurstville, a large suburb with a multitude of commercial buildings and high-rise residential buildings dominating the skyline, has become a CBD for the southern suburbs.[149] Northern Sydney Further information: Northern Sydney Chatswood commercial district. 'Northern Sydney' may also include the suburbs in the Upper North Shore, Lower North Shore and the Northern Beaches. The Northern Suburbs include several landmarks Macquarie University, Gladesville Bridge, Ryde Bridge, Macquarie Centre and Curzon Hall in Marsfield. This area includes suburbs in the local government areas of Hornsby Shire, City of Ryde, the Municipality of Hunter's Hill and parts of the City of Parramatta. The North Shore, an informal geographic term referring to the northern metropolitan area of Sydney, consists of Artarmon, Chatswood, Roseville, Lindfield, Killara, Gordon, Pymble, Hornsby and many others. The Lower North Shore usually refers to the suburbs adjacent to the harbour such as Neutral Bay, Waverton, Mosman, Cremorne, Cremorne Point, Lavender Bay, Milsons Point, Cammeray, Northbridge, and North Sydney. Hunters Hill and Gladesville are often also considered as being part of the Lower North Shore.[150] The Lower North Shore's eastern boundary is Middle Harbour, or at the Roseville Bridge at Castle Cove and Roseville Chase. The Upper North Shore usually refers to the suburbs between Chatswood and Hornsby. It is made up of suburbs located within Ku-ring-gai and Hornsby Shire councils. The North Shore includes the commercial centres of North Sydney and Chatswood. North Sydney itself consists of a large commercial centre, with its own business centre, which contains the second largest concentration of high-rise buildings in Sydney, after the CBD. North Sydney is dominated by advertising, marketing businesses and associated trades, with many large corporations holding office in the region. The Northern Beaches area includes Manly, one of Sydney's most popular holiday destinations for much of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The region also features Sydney Heads, a series of headlands which form the 2 km (1.2 mi) wide entrance to Sydney Harbour. The Northern Beaches area extends south to the entrance of Port Jackson (Sydney Harbour), west to Middle Harbour and north to the entrance of Broken Bay. The 2011 Australian census found the Northern Beaches to be the most white and mono-ethnic district in Australia, contrasting with its more-diverse neighbours, the North Shore and the Central Coast.[151] A typical suburban street in the Hills. Pictured: Lindfield. Hills district The Hills district generally refers to the suburbs in north-western Sydney including the local government areas of The Hills Shire, parts of the City of Parramatta Council and Hornsby Shire. Actual suburbs and localities that are considered to be in the Hills District can be somewhat amorphous and variable. For example, the Hills District Historical Society restricts its definition to the Hills Shire local government area, yet its study area extends from Parramatta to the Hawkesbury. The region is so named for its characteristically comparatively hilly topography as the Cumberland Plain lifts up, joining the Hornsby Plateau. Several of its suburbs also have "Hill" or "Hills" in their names, such as Baulkham Hills, Castle Hill, Seven Hills, Pendle Hill, Beaumont Hills, and Winston Hills, among others. Windsor and Old Windsor Roads are historic roads in Australia, as they are the second and third roads, respectively, laid in the colony.[152] Western suburbs Further information: Greater Western Sydney An aerial view of Greater Western Sydney: As well as being mostly suburban in nature, western Sydney is also made up of various industrial precincts and business parks Parramatta is a major commercial hub for Western Sydney The greater western suburbs encompasses the areas of Parramatta, the sixth largest business district in Australia, settled the same year as the harbour-side colony,[153] Bankstown, Liverpool, Penrith, and Fairfield. Covering 5,800 square kilometres (2,200 sq mi) and having an estimated resident population as at 2017 of 2,288,554, western Sydney has the most multicultural suburbs in the country. The population is predominantly of a working class background, with major employment in the heavy industries and vocational trade.[154] Toongabbie is noted for being the third mainland settlement (after Sydney and Parramatta) set up after the British colonisation of Australia began in 1788, although the site of the settlement is actually in the separate suburb of Old Toongabbie.[155] The western suburb of Prospect, in the City of Blacktown, is home to Raging Waters, a water park operated by Parques Reunidos.[156] Auburn Botanic Gardens, a botanical garden situated in Auburn, attracts thousands of visitors each year, including a significant number from outside Australia.[157] Another prominent park and garden in the west is Central Gardens Nature Reserve in Merrylands West.[158] The greater west also includes Sydney Olympic Park, a suburb created to host the 2000 Summer Olympics, and Sydney Motorsport Park, a motorsport circuit located in Eastern Creek.[159] The Boothtown Aqueduct in Greystanes is a 19th-century water bridge that is listed on the New South Wales State Heritage Register as a site of State significance.[160] To the northwest, Featherdale Wildlife Park, an Australian zoo in Doonside, near Blacktown, is a major tourist attraction, not just for Western Sydney, but for NSW and Australia.[161] Westfield Parramatta in Parramatta is Australia's busiest Westfield shopping centre, having 28.7 million customer visits per annum.[162] Established in 1799, the Old Government House, a historic house museum and tourist spot in Parramatta, was included in the Australian National Heritage List on 1 August 2007 and World Heritage List in 2010 (as part of the 11 penal sites constituting the Australian Convict Sites), making it the only site in greater western Sydney to be featured in such lists.[163] Moreover, the house is Australia's oldest surviving public building.[164] Prospect Hill, a historically significant ridge in the west and the only area in Sydney with ancient volcanic activity,[165] is also listed on the NSW State Heritage Register.[166] Further to the southwest is the region of Macarthur and the city of Campbelltown, a significant population centre until the 1990s considered a region separate to Sydney proper. Macarthur Square, a shopping complex in Campbelltown, has become one of the largest shopping complexes in Sydney.[167] The southwest also features Bankstown Reservoir, the oldest elevated reservoir constructed in reinforced concrete that is still in use and is listed on the New South Wales State Heritage Register.[168] The southwest is home to one of Sydney's oldest trees, the Bland Oak, which was planted in the 1840s by William Bland in the suburb of Carramar.[169] Urban structure The Sydney CBD with the Opera House and Harbour Bridge Architecture See also: Architecture of Sydney, List of heritage houses in Sydney, and List of tallest buildings in Sydney The Central Business District serves as the main core of the city. Sydney is home to the most high-rise buildings in the nation [170] The earliest structures in the colony were built to the bare minimum of standards. Upon his appointment, Governor Lachlan Macquarie set ambitious targets for the architectural design of new construction projects. The city now has a world heritage listed building, several national heritage listed buildings, and dozens of Commonwealth heritage listed buildings as evidence of the survival of Macquarie's ideals.[171][172][173] In 1814 the Governor called on a convict named Francis Greenway to design Macquarie Lighthouse.[174] The lighthouse and its Classical design earned Greenway a pardon from Macquarie in 1818 and introduced a culture of refined architecture that remains to this day.[175] Greenway went on to design the Hyde Park Barracks in 1819 and the Georgian style St James's Church in 1824.[176][177] Gothic-inspired architecture became more popular from the 1830s. John Verge's Elizabeth Bay House and St Philip's Church of 1856 were built in Gothic Revival style along with Edward Blore's Government House of 1845.[178][179] Kirribilli House, completed in 1858, and St Andrew's Cathedral, Australia's oldest cathedral,[180] are rare examples of Victorian Gothic construction.[178][181] Many of Sydney's oldest buildings were built with materials sourced from Hawkesbury sandstone. The General Post Office is a notable example From the late 1850s there was a shift towards Classical architecture. Mortimer Lewis designed the Australian Museum in 1857.[182] The General Post Office, completed in 1891 in Victorian Free Classical style, was designed by James Barnet.[183] Barnet also oversaw the 1883 reconstruction of Greenway's Macquarie Lighthouse.[174][175] Customs House was built in 1844 to the specifications of Lewis, with additions from Barnet in 1887 and W L Vernon in 1899.[184] The neo-Classical and French Second Empire style Town Hall was completed in 1889.[185][186] Romanesque designs gained favour amongst Sydney's architects from the early 1890s. Sydney Technical College was completed in 1893 using both Romanesque Revival and Queen Anne approaches.[187] The Queen Victoria Building was designed in Romanesque Revival fashion by George McRae and completed in 1898.[188] It was built on the site of the Sydney Central Markets and accommodates 200 shops across its three storeys.[189] The art-deco AWA Tower in 1939. The ornate buildings in the foreground were demolished during the contemporary boom of the 1960s70s. As the wealth of the settlement increased, and as Sydney developed into a metropolis after Federation in 1901, its buildings became taller. Sydney's first tower was Culwulla Chambers on the corner of King Street and Castlereagh Street which topped out at 50 metres (160 feet) making 12 floors. The Commercial Traveller's Club, located in Martin Place and built in 1908, was of similar height at 10 floors. It was built in a brick stone veneer and demolished in 1972 to make way for Harry Seidler's MLC Centre.[190] This heralded a change in Sydney's cityscape and with the lifting of height restrictions in the 1960s there came a surge of high-rise construction.[191] Acclaimed architects such as Jean Nouvel, Harry Seidler, Richard Rogers, Renzo Piano, Norman Foster, and Frank Gehry have each made their own contribution to the city's skyline. The Great Depression had a tangible influence on Sydney's architecture. New structures became more restrained with far less ornamentation than was common before the 1930s. The most notable architectural feat of this period is the Harbour Bridge. Its steel arch was designed by John Bradfield and completed in 1932. A total of 39,000 tonnes of structural steel span the 503 metres (1,650 feet) between Milsons Point and Dawes Point.[70][192] The atrium of 1 Bligh Street, an example of Sydney's contemporary architecture Modern and International architecture came to Sydney from the 1940s. Since its completion in 1973 the city's Opera House has become a World Heritage Site and one of the world's most renowned pieces of Modern design. It was conceived by Jrn Utzon with contributions from Peter Hall, Lionel Todd, and David Littlemore. Utzon was awarded the Pritzker Prize in 2003 for his work on the Opera House.[193] Sydney is home to Australia's first building by renowned Canadian-American architect Frank Gehry, the Dr Chau Chak Wing Building (2015), based on the design of a tree house. An entrance from The Goods Linea pedestrian pathway and former railway lineis located on the eastern border of the site. Contemporary buildings in the CBD include Citigroup Centre,[194] Aurora Place,[195] Chifley Tower,[196][197] the Reserve Bank building,[198] Deutsche Bank Place,[199] MLC Centre,[200] and Capita Centre.[201] The tallest structure is Sydney Tower, designed by Donald Crone and completed in 1981.[202] Regulations limited new buildings to a height of 235 metres (771 feet) due to the proximity of Sydney Airport, although strict restrictions employed in the early 2000s have slowly been relaxed in the past ten years, with a maximum height restriction now sitting at 330 metres (1083 feet)[203]. Green bans and heritage overlays have been in place since at least 1977 to protect Sydney's heritage after controversial demolitions in the 1970s led to an outcry from Sydneysiders to preserve the old and keep history intact, sufficiently balancing old and new architecture.[204] Housing Victorian terraces in Paddington Sydney surpass both New York City and Paris real estate prices, having some of the most expensive in the world,[205][206] The city remains Australia's most expensive housing market, with the mean house price at $1,142,212 as of December 2019 (over 25% higher the national mean house price).[207] Detached housing is more prominent in the suburbs, such as this Federation house which is a common architectural style There were 1.76 million dwellings in Sydney in 2016 including 925,000 (57%) detached houses, 227,000 (14%) semi-detached terrace houses and 456,000 (28%) units and apartments.[208] Whilst terrace houses are common in the inner city areas, it is detached houses that dominate the landscape in the outer suburbs. Due to environmental and economic pressures there has been a noted trend towards denser housing. There was a 30% increase in the number of apartments in Sydney between 1996 and 2006.[209] Public housing in Sydney is managed by the Government of New South Wales.[210] Suburbs with large concentrations of public housing include Claymore, Macquarie Fields, Waterloo, and Mount Druitt. The Government has announced plans to sell nearly 300 historic public housing properties in the harbourside neighbourhoods of Millers Point, Gloucester Street, and The Rocks.[211] Sydney is one of the most expensive real estate markets globally. It is only second to Hong Kong with the average property costing 14 times the annual Sydney salary as of December 2016.[212] A range of heritage housing styles can be found throughout Sydney. Terrace houses are found in the inner suburbs such as Paddington, The Rocks, Potts Point and Balmainmany of which have been the subject of gentrification.[213][214] These terraces, particularly those in suburbs such as The Rocks, were historically home to Sydney's miners and labourers. In the present day, terrace houses


nude bikini pics clinton photos chelsea pictures desnuda fotos naked laura porn free porno fan and linda video site lisa kelly playboy topless lolo joan xxx official sex traci ferrari lords eva photo the nue tube pic videos sexy smith ana leah welch lovelace you remini club loren giacomo karen elizabeth carangi fake julia trinity ava kate fenech dana pozzi images gallery edwige moana victoria kristel joanna pornstar foto sylvia rachel pamela principal clips movies lauren shania valerie fabian collins nia rio del robin rhodes hart jane stevens measurements susan taylor jenny sanchez moore lane antonelli lancaume nancy roselyn emily hartley boobs brooke angie kim web demi bonet carrie allen grant hot esther deborah with braga jones fansite yates freeones
lee heather tina inger severance christina louise lopez gina wallpaper nacked ann film nackt fisher carey corinne shue ass vancamp clery model shannon elisabeth panties biografia angelina sofia erin monroe dazza charlene janet doris vanessa anna belinda reguera diane paula fucking scene peeples sonia shauna autopsy monica sharon patricia alicia plato bardot
melissa movie picture cynthia nicole maria star nina julie mary gemser naomi williams torrent nuda barbara twain anderson gia nudes fakes larue pussy actress upskirt san raquel jennifer tits mariah meg sandra big michelle roberts marie lumley tewes clip salma vergara jada cristal day shields cassidy sandrelli penthouse dickinson goldie nud angel brigitte drew fucked amanda shemale olivia website milano ellen ellison vidcaps hayek stone download carmen bessie swimsuit vera zeta locklear shirley anal gray cindy marilyn connie kayla sucking streep cock jensen john tiffani stockings hawn for weaver rue barrymore catherine bellucci rebecca bondage feet applegate jolie sigourney wilkinson nipples juliet revealing teresa magazine kennedy ashley what bio biography agutter wood her jordan hill com jessica pornos blowjob
lesbian nued grace hardcore regera palmer asia theresa leeuw heaton juhi alyssa pinkett rene actriz black vicky jamie ryan gillian massey short shirtless scenes maggie dreyfus lynne mpegs melua george thiessen jean june crawford alex natalie bullock playmate berry andrews maren kleevage quennessen pix hair shelley tiffany gunn galleries from russo dhue lebrock leigh fuck stefania tilton laurie russell vids bessie swimsuit vera zeta shirley locklear anal gray cindy marilyn connie kayla sucking streep cock jensen john tiffani stockings hawn for weaver rue catherine barrymore bellucci rebecca bondage feet applegate jolie george thiessen jean june crawford alex sigourney wilkinson nipples juliet revealing teresa magazine kennedy ashley what bio biography agutter jordan wood her hill com jessica pornos blowjob lesbian nued grace
hardcore regera palmer asia theresa leeuw heaton juhi alyssa pinkett rene actriz black vicky rutherford lohan winslet spungen shawnee swanson newton hannah leslie silverstone did frann wallpapers kidman louis kristy valeria lang fiorentino deanna rita hillary katie granny girls megan tori paris arquette amber sue escort chawla dorothy jessie anthony courtney shot sites kay meryl judy candice desnudo wallace gertz show teen savannah busty schneider glass thong spears young erika aniston stiles capshaw loni imagenes von myspace jena daryl girl hotmail nicola savoy
garr bonnie sexe play adriana donna angelique love actor mitchell unger sellecca adult hairstyles malone teri hayworth lynn harry kara rodriguez films welles peliculas kaprisky uschi blakely halle lindsay miranda jami jamie ryan gillian massey short scenes shirtless maggie dreyfus lynne mpegs melua natalie bullock playmate berry andrews maren kleevage quennessen pix hair shelley tiffany gunn









www.shanagrant.com

Shauna Grant The Last Porn Queen