Starlyn Simone : This Is An Un Official Fan Site Tribute
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Movie Title Year Distributor Notes Rev Formats 3 Phases of Eve 1972 Something Weird Video NonSex O Adultery for Fun and Profit 1971 Something Weird Video O Angel Above the Devil Below 1975 Metro 1 DRO Aphrodisiac 1971 Something Weird Video 1 DO Baby Sister 1973 Unknown Best of VCX Classics 2 2005 VCX 1 DO Big Hair Romp 1974 Something Weird Video Big Rape 1974 Alpha Blue Archives Big Snatch (II) 1971 Vinegar Syndrome O Boogie Down with John Holmes 2000 Hollywood Video BJOnly DO Candy Samples Video Review 1984 4-Play Video BJOnly O Carnal Cure 1973 Something Weird Video D Climax of Blue Power 1974 Eros Video NonSex 1 DO Cold Feet 1973 Something Weird Video DRO Coming West 1971 Exodus Archives / Shooting Star 1 O Country Cuzzins 1970 BoxOffice International Pictures NonSex
Dick and I 1971 After Hours Cinema O Dirty Western 1975 Arrow Productions 3 DRO Erotic Adventures of Zorro 1972 Something Weird Video NonSex Fancy Lady 1971 Retro Seduction Cinema NonSex O Heads or Tails 1973 Unknown NonSex Hitchhiker's Hold Up 1973 Something Weird Video Hot Connections 1972 Something Weird Video NonSex House Is Not a Home 1971 Alpha Blue Archives LezOnly O Ladies Bed Companion 1972 After Hours Cinema O Love and the Great Grunt 1973 Alpha Blue Archives NonSex O Never Enough 1971 Something Weird Video O Ozark Virgin 1972 TGA Video DRO Partnership 1973 After Hours Cinema O Pastries 1975 VCX NonSex DO Peacock Lady 1972 Something Weird Video Playmates 1973 Pathfinder Home Entertainment NonSex Clip O Sam Dobbs and the Guru Gangbang 1970 After Hours Cinema O Sex As You Like It 1972 TGA Video BJOnly O Sexual Liberty Now 1971 After Hours Cinema Clip 1 O



Sexus in Paradise 1974 Something Weird Video Sleazy Rider 1973 Arrow Productions NonSex O Snow Bunnies 1972 Alpha Blue Archives NonSex O South of the Border 1976 VCA Clip DRO Strangers 1972 Unknown Teenage Cruisers 1977 VCX Clip 3 DRO That's Erotic 1979 VCX DRO Thirteen Blue Doors 1971 Vinegar Syndrome 1 O Vice versus Vice 1971 Vinegar Syndrome O Weekend Cowgirls 1983 Caballero Home Video Clip community among blacks was the Black church, usually the first communal institution to be established. The Black church- was both an expression of community and unique African-American spirituality, and a reaction to discrimination. The churches also served as neighborhood centers where free black people could celebrate their African heritage without intrusion from white detractors. The church also served as the center of education. Since the church was part of the community and wanted to provide education; it educated the freed and enslaved Blacks. Seeking autonomy, some blacks like Richard Allen (bishop) founded separate Black denominations.[33] The Second Great Awakening (18001830s) has been called the "central and defining event in the development of Afro-Christianity."[34][35] The antebellum period See also: History of the United States (17891849) and Origins of the American Civil War As the United States grew, the institution of slavery became more entrenched in the southern states, while northern states began to abolish it. Pennsylvania was the first, in 1780 passing an act for gradual abolition.[36] A number of events continued to shape views on slavery. One of these events was the Haitian Revolution, which was the only slave revolt that led to an independent country. Many slave owners fled to the United States with tales of horror and massacre that alarmed Southern whites.[37] The invention of the cotton gin in the 1790s allowed the cultivation of short staple cotton, which could be grown in much of the Deep South, where warm weather and proper soil conditions prevailed. The industrial revolution in Europe and New England generated a heavy demand for cotton for cheap clothing, which caused an exponential demand for slave labor to develop new cotton plantations. There was a 70% increase in the number of slaves in the United States in only 20 years. They were overwhelmingly concentrated on plantations in the Deep South, and moved west as old cotton fields lost their productivity and new lands were purchased. Unlike the Northern States who put more focus into manufacturing and commerce, the South was heavily dependent on agriculture.[38] Southern political economists at this time supported the institution by concluding that nothing was inherently contradictory about owning slaves and that a future of slavery existed even if the South were to industrialize.[39] Racial, economic, and political turmoil reached an all-time high regarding slavery up to the events of the Civil War. In 1807, at the urging of President Thomas Jefferson, Congress abolished the international slave trade. While American Blacks celebrated this as a victory in the fight against slavery, the ban increased the demand for slaves. Changing agricultural practices in the Upper South from tobacco to mixed farming decreased labor requirements, and slaves were sold to traders for the developing Deep South. In addition, the Fugitive Slave Act of 1793 allowed any Black person to be claimed as a runaway unless a White person testified on their behalf. A number of free Blacks, especially indentured children, were kidnapped and sold into slavery with little or no hope of rescue. By 1819 there were exactly 11 free and 11 slave states, which increased sectionalism. Fears of an imbalance in Congress led to the 1820 Missouri Compromise that required states to be admitted to the union in pairs, one slave and one free.[40] In 1850 after winning the Mexican war a crisis gripped the nation what to do about the territories won from Mexico. Henry Clay, the man behind the compromise of 1820, once more rose to the challenge to craft the compromise of 1850. In this compromise the territories of New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, and Nevada would be organized but the issue of slavery would be decided later. Washington D.C would abolish the slave trade but not slavery itself. California would be admitted as a free state but the South would receive a new fugitive slave act which required Northerners to return slaves who escaped to the North to their owners. The compromise of 1850 would maintain a shaky peace until the election of Lincoln in 1860.[41] In 1851 the battle between slaves and slave owners was met in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The Christiana Riot (Incident) demonstrated the growing conflict between states rights and the federal legislature on the issue of slavery.[42] Abolitionism Abolitionists in Britain and the United States in the 1840-1860 period developed large, complex propaganda campaigns against slavery. Stampp says that, "Though abolitionists never argued that the physical treatment of slaves had any decisive bearing on the issue of the morality of slavery, their propaganda emphasized (and doubtless exaggerated) cruelties and atrocities for the purpose of winning converts."[43] Blight says, "The authenticity of these reports about southern atrocity is questionable. I know of no verification for them. The propaganda uses of such stories, though, were not lost on abolitionist editors such as Douglass."[44] Kennicott argues that the largest and most effective abolitionist speakers were the blacks who spoke before the countless local meetings of the National Negro Conventions. They used the traditional arguments against slavery, protesting it on moral, economic, and political grounds. Their role in the antislavery movement not only aided abolitionist propaganda but also was a source of pride to the black community.[45] In 1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe published a novel and play that changed how the North would view slavery. Uncle Tom's Cabin tells the story of the life of a slave and the brutality that is faced by that life day after day. It would sell over 100,000 copies in its first year. The popularity of Uncle Tom's Cabin would solidify the North in its opposition to slavery. Lincoln would later invite Stowe to the White House in honor of this book that changed America. In 1856 Charles Sumner a Massachusetts congressmen and antislavery leader was assaulted and nearly killed on the House floor by Preston Brooks of South Carolina. Brooks received praise in the South for his actions while being condemned in the North and Sumner became an iconic martyr in the North. Sumner later returned to the Senate where he was a leader of the Radical Republicans in ending slavery and legislating equal rights for freed slaves.[46] Over 1 million slaves were moved from the older seaboard slave states, with their declining economies to the rich cotton states of the southwest; many others were sold and moved locally.[47] Berlin (2000) argues that this "Second Middle Passage shredded the planters' paternalist pretenses in the eyes of black people and prodded slaves and free people of color to create a host of oppositional ideologies and institutions that better accounted for the realities of endless deportations, expulsions and flights that continually remade their world.[48] Benjamin Quarles' work Black Abolitionists provides the most extensive account of the role of black abolitionists in the American anti-slavery movement.[49] The Black community [50] Blacks generally settled in cities creating the core of black community life in the region. They established churches and fraternal orders. Many of these early efforts were weak and often failed, but they represented the initial steps in the evolution of black communities.[51] During the early Antebellum period, the creation of free black communities began to expand, laying out a foundation for African Americans' future. At first, only a few thousand African Americans had their freedom. As the years went by, the number of blacks being freed expanded tremendously, building to 233,000 by the 1820s. They sometimes sued to gain their freedom or purchased it. Some slave owners had freed their bondspeople and a few state legislatures abolished slavery.[52] African Americans tried to take the advantage of establishing homes and jobs in the cities. During the early 1800s free blacks took several steps to establish fulfilling work lives in urban areas.[53] The rise of industrialization, which depended on power-driven machinery more than human labor, might have afforded them employment, but many owners of textile mills refused to hire black workers. These owners considered whites to be more reliable and educable. This resulted in many blacks performing unskilled labor. Black men worked as stevedores, construction worker, and as cellar-, well- and grave-diggers. As for black women workers, they worked as servants for white families. Some women were also cooks, seamstresses, basket-makers, midwives, teachers and nurses.[52] Black women worked as washerwomen or domestic servants for the white families. Some cities had independent black seamstresses, cooks, basketmakers, confectioners and more. While the African Americans left the thought of slavery behind, they made a priority to reunite with their family and friends. The cause of the Revolutionary War forced many blacks to migrate to the west afterwards, and the scourge of poverty created much difficulty with housing. African Americans competed with the Irish and Germans in jobs and had to share space with them.[52] While the majority of free blacks lived in poverty, some were able to establish successful businesses that catered to the Black community. Racial discrimination often meant that Blacks were not welcome or would be mistreated in White businesses and other establishments. To counter this, Blacks like James Forten developed their own communities with Black-owned businesses. Black doctors, lawyers and other businessmen were the foundation of the Black middle class.[54] Blacks organized to help strengthen the Black community and continue the fight against slavery. One of these organizations was the American Society of Free Persons of Colour, founded in 1830. This organization provided social aid to poor blacks and organized responses to political issues. Further supporting the growth of the Black Community was the Black church, usually the first community institution to be established. Starting in the early 1800s [55] with the African Methodist Episcopal Church, African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church and other churches, the Black church grew to be the focal point of the Black community. The Black church- was both an expression of community and unique African-American spirituality, and a reaction to European American discrimination. The church also served as neighborhood centers where free black people could celebrate their African heritage without intrusion by white detractors.[52] The church was the center of the Black communities, but it was also the center of education. Since the church was part of the community and wanted to provide education; they educated the freed and enslaved Blacks.[56] At first, Black preachers formed separate congregations within the existing denominations, such as social clubs or literary societies. Because of discrimination at the higher levels of the church hierarchy, some blacks like Richard Allen (bishop) simply founded separate Black denominations.[57] Free blacks also established Black churches in the South before 1800. After the Great Awakening, many blacks joined the Baptist Church, which allowed for their participation, including roles as elders and preachers. For instance, First Baptist Church and Gillfield Baptist Church of Petersburg, Virginia, both had organized congregations by 1800 and were the first Baptist churches in the city.[58] Petersburg, an industrial city, by 1860 had 3,224 free blacks (36% of blacks, and about 26% of all free persons), the largest population in the South.[59][60] In Virginia, free blacks also created communities in Richmond, Virginia and other towns, where they could work as artisans and create businesses.[61] Others were able to buy land and farm in frontier areas further from white control. The Black community also established schools for Black children, since they were often banned from entering public schools.[62] Richard Allen organized the first Black Sunday school in America; it was established in Philadelphia during 1795.[63] Then five years later, the priest Absalom Jones established a school for black youth.[63] Black Americans regarded education as the surest path to economic success, moral improvement and personal happiness. Only the sons and daughters of the black middle class had the luxury of studying.[52] Haiti's effect on slavery Main article: Haitian Revolution The revolt of Haitian slaves against their white slave owners, which began in 1791 and lasted until 1801, was a primary source of fuel for both slaves and abolitionists arguing for the freedom of Africans in the U.S. In the 1833 edition of Nile's Weekly Register it is stated that freed blacks in Haiti were better off than their Jamaican counterparts, and the positive effects of American Emancipation are alluded to throughout the paper.[64] These anti-slavery sentiments were popular among both white abolitionists and African-American slaves. Slaves rallied around these ideas with rebellions against their masters as well as white bystanders during the Denmark Vesey Conspiracy of 1822 and the Nat Turner Rebellion of 1831. Leaders and plantation owners were also very concerned about the consequences Haiti's revolution would have on early America. Thomas Jefferson, for one, was wary of the "instability of the West Indies", referring to Haiti.[65] The Dred Scott decision Main article: Dred Scott v. Sandford Peter[66] aka Gordon, a former slave displays the telltale criss-cross, keloid scars from being bullwhipped, 1863. Dred Scott was a slave whose master had taken him to live in the free state of Illinois. After his master's death, Dred Scott sued in court for his freedom on the basis of his having lived in a free state for a long period. The black community received an enormous shock with the Supreme Court's "Dred Scott" decision in March 1857.[67] Blacks were not American citizens and could never be citizens, the court said in a decision roundly denounced by the Republican Party as well as the abolitionists. Because slaves were property, not people, by this ruling they could not sue in court. The decision was finally reversed by the Civil Rights Act of 1865.[68] In what is sometimes considered mere obiter dictum the Court went on to hold that Congress had no authority to prohibit slavery in federal territories because slaves are personal property and the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution protects property owners against deprivation of their property without due process of law. Although the Supreme Court has never explicitly overruled the Dred Scott case, the Court stated in the Slaughter-House Cases that at least one part of it had already been overruled by the Fourteenth Amendment in 1868, which begins by stating, "All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside." [69] The American Civil War, Emancipation See also: American Civil War, Military history of African Americans in the American Civil War, and Emancipation Proclamation The Emancipation Proclamation was an executive order issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863. In a single stroke it changed the legal status, as recognized by the U.S. government, of 3 million slaves in designated areas of the Confederacy from "slave" to "free." It had the practical effect that as soon as a slave escaped the control of the Confederate government, by running away or through advances of federal troops, the slave became legally and actually free. The owners were never compensated. Plantation owners, realizing that emancipation would destroy their economic system, sometimes moved their slaves as far as possible out of reach of the Union army. By June 1865, the Union Army controlled all of the Confederacy


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