Tina Davis : This Is An Un Official Fan Site Tribute
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Movie Title Year Distributor Notes Rev Formats Black Heat 1986 VCR DVDOnly DO Black Superstars 1987 Coast To Coast DO Black Taboo 1984 VCA Bald DO Ebony Erotica 2 1985 VCR DRO Hot Chocolate 1 1984 Essex Video / Electric Hollywood DO Limited Edition Film 221 1983 AVC Screw Erotic Video 1 1985 Metro Clip Triple Dare 1988 LA Video BJOnly Facial Huntsville is a city in the Appalachian region of northern Alabama.[10] It is the county seat of Madison County[11] but extends west into neighboring Limestone County[12] and south into Morgan County.[13] It was founded in 1805 and became an incorporated town in 1811. The city grew across nearby hills north of the Tennessee River, adding textile mills, then munitions factories, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the United States Army Aviation and Missile Command nearby at the Redstone Arsenal. The National Trust for Historic Preservation named Huntsville to its "America's Dozen Distinctive Destinations for 2010" list.[14] The city's population was 180,105 in 2010, making it Alabama's fourth-largest city.[7][15] Huntsville is the largest city in the five-county Huntsville-Decatur-Albertville, AL Combined Statistical Area.[16] The Huntsville metropolitan area's population was 417,593 in 2010,[17] making it the second most populous metropolitan area in the state.[18] The Huntsville metro's population reached 462,693 by 2018.
Contents 1 History 1.1 First settlers 1.2 Incorporation 1.3 Emerging industries 1.4 Civil War 1.5 After the Civil War 1.6 Great Depression 1930s 1.7 World War II 1.8 Missile development 1.9 Early American space flight 1.10 Biotechnology 2 Geography 2.1 Boundaries 2.2 Climate 3 Demographics 3.1 2010 census 3.2 Demographic distribution 3.3 Sex ratio and income distribution 4 Politics and government 5 Public safety and health 5.1 Fire 5.1.1 Volunteer organizations 5.2 Emergency medical services 5.3 Police 5.3.1 Police Academy 5.4 Hospitals 6 Economy 6.1 Retail 6.2 Space and defense 6.3 Automobiles 7 Infrastructure 7.1 Transportation 7.1.1 Public transit 7.1.2 Railroads 7.2 Air service 7.3 Ports 7.4 Bicycle routes 7.5 Utilities 8 Media and communications 8.1 Newspapers 8.2 Magazines 8.3 Radio 8.4 Television 8.5 Film 9 Education 9.1 K12 education 9.2 Budgeting 9.3 Higher education 10 Culture 10.1 Historic districts 10.2 Museums 10.3 Parks 10.4 Festivals 10.5 Golf courses 10.6 Libraries 10.7 Arts associations 10.7.1 Arts Huntsville 10.8 Performing arts 10.9 Visual arts 10.10 Convention center and arena 10.11 Local breweries



10.12 Comedy 10.13 Other 11 Sports 11.1 Current sports franchises 11.2 Past sports franchises 11.3 Stadiums 12 Notable people 13 Sister cities 14 References 15 Bibliography 16 External links History See also: Timeline of Huntsville, Alabama First settlers The first settlers of the area were Muscogee-speaking people.[20] The Chickasaw traditionally claim to have settled around 1300 after coming east across the Mississippi. A combination of factors, including disease, land disputes between the Choctaw and Cherokee, and pressures from the United States government had largely depopulated the area by the time Revolutionary War veteran John Hunt settled in the land around the Big Spring in 1805. The 1805 Treaty with the Chickasaws and the Cherokee Treaty of Washington of 1806 ceded native claims to the United States government. The area was subsequently purchased by LeRoy Pope, who named the area Twickenham after the home village of his distant kinsman Alexander Pope.[21] The Big Spring, the center of the street plan in Twickenham (renamed "Huntsville" in 1812) Twickenham was carefully planned, with streets laid out on the northeast to southwest direction based on the flow of Big Spring. However, due to anti-British sentiment during this period, the name was changed to "Huntsville" to honor John Hunt, who had been forced to move to other land south of the new city.[22] Both John Hunt and LeRoy Pope were Freemasons and charter members of Helion Lodge #1, the oldest Lodge in Alabama.[23] Incorporation In 1811, Huntsville became the first incorporated town in Alabama. However, the recognized "founding" year of the city is 1805, the year of John Hunt's arrival. The city celebrated its sesquicentennial in 1955[24] and its bicentennial in 2005.[25] Wade House, 1939, by Frances Benjamin Johnston David Wade arrived in Huntsville in 1817. He built the David Wade House on the north side of what is now Bob Wade Lane (Robert B. Wade was David's grandson) just east of Mt. Lebanon Road. It had six rough Doric columns on the portico. During the Great Depression, the Wade House was measured as part of the Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) to be included in the government's Archive and was photographed by Frances Benjamin Johnston for the project. This project put architects, draftsmen, and photographers to work to create an inventory of documentation and photographs of significant properties across the country. The house had already been abandoned for years and was considerably deteriorated. It was torn down in 1952. Today only the antebellum smokehouse, an imposing structure itself, survives at the property.[26] Emerging industries Huntsville's quick growth was from wealth generated by the cotton and railroad industries. Many wealthy planters moved into the area from Virginia, Georgia, and the Carolinas.[citation needed] In 1819, Huntsville hosted a constitutional convention in Walker Allen's large cabinetmaking shop. The 44 delegates meeting there wrote a constitution for the new state of Alabama. In accordance with the new state constitution, Huntsville became Alabama's first capital when the state was admitted to the Union. This was a temporary designation for one legislative session only. The capital was moved to more central cities; to Cahawba, then to Tuscaloosa, and finally to Montgomery.[27] In 1855, the Memphis and Charleston Railroad was constructed through Huntsville, becoming the first railway to link the Atlantic seacoast with the lower Mississippi River.[28] Civil War A Union officer of General Mitchell's army sketched Huntsville during the 1862 occupation. Huntsville initially opposed secession from the Union in 1861, but provided many men for the Confederacy's efforts.[29] The 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment, led by Col. Egbert J. Jones of Huntsville, distinguished itself at the Battle of Manassas/Bull Run, the first major encounter of the American Civil War. The Fourth Alabama Infantry, which contained two Huntsville companies, were the first Alabama troops to fight in the war and were present when Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox Court House in April 1865. Nine generals of the war were born in or near Huntsville, split five to the Confederate and four to the Union.[30] On the morning of April 11, 1862, Union troops led by General Ormsby M. Mitchel seized Huntsville in order to sever the Confederacy's rail communications and gain access to the Memphis & Charleston Railroad. Huntsville was the control point for the Western Division of the Memphis & Charleston,[31] and by controlling this railroad the Union had struck a major blow to the Confederacy. During the first occupation, Union officers occupied many of the larger homes in the city while the enlisted soldiers camped mainly on the outskirts. In the initial occupation, the Union troops searched for both Confederate troops hiding in the town and weapons. Since they occupied the city, treatment toward Huntsville was relatively civil. However, residents of the nearby towns did not fare as well.[32] The Union troops were forced to retreat only a few months later, but they returned to Huntsville in the fall of 1863 and thereafter used the city as a base of operations for the war, except during the last months of 1864. While many homes and villages in the surrounding countryside were burned in retaliation for the active guerrilla warfare in the area, Huntsville itself survived because it housed Union Army troops.[32] After the Civil War Child workers at Merrimac Mills in Huntsville, November 1910, photograph by Lewis Hine After the Civil War, Huntsville became a center for cotton textile mills, such as Lincoln, Dallas, and Merrimack. Each mill company constructed worker housing, in communities that included schools, churches, grocery stores, theaters, and hardware stores, all within walking distance of the mill. In some of these, workers were required to buy goods at the company stores, which sometimes overcharged them. The mill owners could throw out workers from housing if they violated policies about behavior.[citation needed] A dairy cow called Lily Flagg broke the world record for butter production in 1892. Her Huntsville-resident owner General Samuel H. Moore painted his house butter yellow and organized a party to celebrate, arranging for electric lights for the dance floor.[33] An area south of Huntsville was named Lily Flagg before 1906.[34][35] This area was later annexed by the city. Great Depression 1930s During the 1930s, industry declined in Huntsville due to the Great Depression. Huntsville became known as the Watercress Capital of the World[36] because of its abundant harvest in the area. Madison County led Alabama in cotton production during this time.[36] World War II By 1940, Huntsville was still relatively small, with a population of about 13,000 inhabitants. This quickly changed in early 1941 when the U.S. Army selected 35,000 acres (140 km2) of land adjoining the southwest area of the city for building three chemical munitions facilities: the Huntsville Arsenal, the Redstone Ordnance Plant (soon redesignated Redstone Arsenal), and the Gulf Chemical Warfare Depot. These operated throughout World War II, with combined personnel approaching 20,000. Resources in the area were strained as new workers flocked to the area, and the construction of housing could not keep up.[37] Missile development At the end of the war in 1945, the munitions facilities were no longer needed. They were combined with the designation Redstone Arsenal (RSA), and a considerable political and business effort was made in attempts to attract new tenants. One significant start involved manufacturing the Keller automobile, but this closed after 18 vehicles were built. With the encouragement of US Senator John Sparkman, the U.S. Army Air Force considered this for a major testing facility, but then selected another site. Redstone Arsenal was prepared for disposal, but Sparkman used his considerable Southern Democratic influence (the Solid South controlled numerous powerful chairmanships of congressional committees) to persuade the Army to choose it as a site for rocket and missile development.[38] RSA commander Maj. Gen. John Medaris, Wernher von Braun, and RSA deputy commander Brig. Gen. Holger Toftoy (l-r:) in the 1950s In 1950, about 1,000 personnel were transferred from Fort Bliss, Texas, to Redstone Arsenal to form the Ordnance Guided Missile Center (OGMC). Central to this was a group of about 200 Nazi scientists and engineers from Germany, led by Wernher von Braun; they had been brought to America by Colonel Holger Toftoy under Operation Paperclip following World War II. Assigned to the center at Huntsville, they settled and reared families in this area.[39] As the Korean War started, the OGMC was given the mission to develop what eventually became the Redstone Rocket. This rocket set the stage for the United States' space program, as well as major Army missile programs, to be centered in Huntsville. Toftoy, then a brigadier general, commanded OGMC and the overall Redstone Arsenal. In early 1956, the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) under Major General John Medaris was formed.[38] Early American space flight Historic rockets in Rocket Park of the U.S. Space & Rocket Center, Huntsville, Alabama The city is nicknamed "The Rocket City" for its close association with U.S. space missions.[40] On January 31, 1958, ABMA placed America's first satellite, Explorer 1, into orbit using a Jupiter-C launch vehicle, a descendant of the Redstone. This brought national attention to Redstone Arsenal and Huntsville, with widespread recognition of this being a major center for high technology.[citation needed] On July 1, 1960, 4,670 civilian employees, associated buildings and equipment, and 1,840 acres (7.4 km2) of land, transferred from ABMA to form NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Wernher von Braun was MSFC's initial director. On September 8, President Dwight D. Eisenhower formally dedicated the MSFC.[41] During the 1960s, the major mission of MSFC was in developing the Saturn boosters used by NASA in the Apollo Lunar Landing Program. For this, MSFC greatly increased its employees, and many new companies joined the Huntsville industrial community. The Cummings Research Park was developed just north of Redstone Arsenal to partially accommodate this industrial growth, and has now became the second-largest research park of this type in America. Huntsville's economy was nearly crippled and growth almost came to a standstill in the 1970s following the closure of the Apollo program. However, the emergence of the Space Shuttle, the International Space Station, and a wide variety of advanced research in space sciences led to a resurgence in NASA-related activities that has continued into the 21st century. In addition, new Army organizations have emerged at Redstone Arsenal, particularly in the ever-expanding field of missile defense.[42] Now in the 2000s, Huntsville has the second-largest technology and research park in the nation,[43] and ranks among the top 25 most educated cities in the nation.[44][45][46] It is considered in the top of the nation's high-tech hotspots,[47][48] and one of the best Southern cities for defense jobs.[49] It is the number


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